(1) Subject to the provisions of articles 109 and 117 with respect to Money Bills and other financial Bills, a Bill may originate in either House of Parliament.

 

(2) Subject to the provisions of articles 108 and 109, a Bill shall not be deemed to have been passed by the Houses of Parliament unless it has been agreed to by both Houses, either without amendment or with such amendments only as are agreed to by both Houses.

 

(3) A Bill pending in Parliament shall not lapse by reason of the prorogation of the Houses.

 

(4) A Bill pending in the Council of States which has not been passed by the House of the People shall not lapse on a dissolution of the House of the People.

 

(5) A Bill which is pending in the House of the People, or which having been passed by the House of the People is pending in the Council of States, shall, subject to the provisions of article 108, lapse on a dissolution of the House of the People.

Debate Summary

Article 87, Draft Constitution 1948

(1) Subject to the provisions of articles 89 and 97 of this Constitution with respect to Money Bills and other financial Bills, a Bill may originate in either House of Parliament.

(2) Subject to the provisions of articles 88 and 89 of this Constitution, a Bill shall not be deemed to have been passed by the Houses of Parliament unless it has been agreed to by both Houses, either without amendment or with such amendments only as are agreed to by both Houses.

(3) A Bill pending in Parliament shall not lapse by reason of the prorogation of the Houses.

(4) A Bill pending in the Council of States which has not been passed by the House of the People shall not lapse on a dissolution of the House of the People.

(5) A Bill which is pending in the House of the People or which having been passed by the House of the People is pending in the Council of States shall, subject to the provisions of article 88 of this Constitution, lapse on a dissolution of the House of the People.

 

Draft Article 87 was debated on 20th May 1949. It regulated the introduction and passing of Bills.

 

A member proposed to provide for the Parliament to receive petitions and representations from the people. People should have the right to represent directly to the legislature on any financial or administrative matters. This would be crucial in testing popular opinion.

 

Another member was opposed to the House of Councils being treated at par with the House of People. He argued that the House of People represented the democratic will and should be given a superior position to that of the House of Councils, a merely advisory body meant to check on ‘hasty legislation’.

 

The Assembly did not accept any amendments. It adopted the Draft Article on 20th May 1949.